GIRM 2002 PDF

Amen, a sacerdote Sacramentum ore recipit, ac postea recedit. Calix semper abstergitur vel ab eo qui bibit vel ab illo qui calicem praesentat. Next, the priest, because of his sacred ministry, and the people, by reason of their baptismal dignity, may be incensed by the deacon or another minister. Eph 2, 20clarius et permanenter significat; ceteris vero locis, sacris celebrationibus dicatis, altare potest esse mobile. Unum autem corpus efficiant sive verbum Dei audiendo, sive in orationibus et in cantu partem habendo, sive praesertim in communi oblatione sacrificii et in communi participatione mensae Domini.

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For in the celebration of Mass, in which the Sacrifice of the Cross is perpetuated, [38] Christ is really present in the very liturgical assembly gathered in his name, in the person of the minister, in his word, and indeed substantially and continuously under the Eucharistic species. The Mass is made up, as it were, of two parts: the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist.

These, however, are so closely interconnected that they form but one single act of worship. When the Sacred Scriptures are read in the Church, God himself speaks to his people, and Christ, present in his own word, proclaims the Gospel. Among the parts assigned to the priest, the foremost is the Eucharistic Prayer, which is the high point of the entire celebration. Next are the orations: that is to say, the collect, the prayer over the offerings, and the prayer after Communion.

These prayers are addressed to God in the name of the entire holy people and all present, by the priest who presides over the assembly in the person of Christ. It is also up to the priest, in the exercise of his office of presiding over the gathered assembly, to offer certain explanations that are foreseen in the rite itself. Where it is indicated in the rubrics, the celebrant is permitted to adapt them somewhat in order that they respond to the understanding of those participating.

However, he should always take care to keep to the sense of the text given in the Missal and to express it succinctly.

The presiding priest is also to direct the word of God and to impart the final blessing. In addition, he may give the faithful a very brief introduction to the Mass of the day after the initial Greeting and before the Act of Penitence , to the Liturgy of the Word before the readings , and to the Eucharistic Prayer before the Preface , though never during the Eucharistic Prayer itself; he may also make concluding comments to the entire sacred action before the dismissal.

The priest, in fact, as the one who presides, prays in the name of the Church and of the assembled community; but at times he prays only in his own name, asking that he may exercise his ministry with greater attention and devotion. Prayers of this kind, which occur before the reading of the Gospel, at the Preparation of the Gifts, and also before and after the Communion of the priest, are said quietly. The Other Formulas in the Celebration Finally, concerning the other formulas: Some constitute an independent rite or act, such as the Gloria, the responsorial Psalm, the Alleluia and verse before the Gospel, the Sanctus, the Memorial Acclamation, and the cantus post communionem song after communion ; Others accompany another rite, such as the chants at the Entrance, at the Offertory, at the fraction Agnus Dei , and at Communion.

The Vocal Expression of the Different Texts In texts that are to be spoken in a loud and clear voice, whether by the priest or the deacon, or by the lector, or by all, the tone of voice should correspond to the genre of the text itself, that is, depending upon whether it is a reading, a prayer, a commentary, an acclamation, or a sung text; the tone should also be suited to the form of celebration and to the solemnity of the gathering.

Consideration should also be given to the idiom of different languages and the culture of different peoples. The Importance of Singing Col Acts Thus St. Great importance should therefore be attached to the use of singing in the celebration of the Mass, with due consideration for the culture of the people and abilities of each liturgical assembly.

Although it is not always necessary e. In the choosing of the parts actually to be sung, however, preference should be given to those that are of greater importance and especially to those to be sung by the priest or the deacon or the lector, with the people responding, or by the priest and people together.

All other things being equal, Gregorian chant holds pride of place because it is proper to the Roman Liturgy. Other types of sacred music, in particular polyphony, are in no way excluded, provided that they correspond to the spirit of the liturgical action and that they foster the participation of all the faithful. The gestures and posture of the priest, the deacon, and the ministers, as well as those of the people, ought to contribute to making the entire celebration resplendent with beauty and noble simplicity, so that the true and full meaning of the different parts of the celebration is evident and that the participation of all is fostered.

A common posture, to be observed by all participants, is a sign of the unity of the members of the Christian community gathered for the sacred Liturgy: it both expresses and fosters the intention and spiritual attitude of the participants.

The faithful should stand from the beginning of the Entrance chant, or while the priest approaches the altar, until the end of the collect; for the Alleluia chant before the Gospel; while the Gospel itself is proclaimed; during the Profession of Faith and the Prayer of the Faithful; from the invitation, Orate, fratres Pray, brethren , before the prayer over the offerings until the end of Mass, except at the places indicated below.

They should, however, sit while the readings before the Gospel and the responsorial Psalm are proclaimed and for the homily and while the Preparation of the Gifts at the Offertory is taking place; and, as circumstances allow, they may sit or kneel while the period of sacred silence after Communion is observed.

In the dioceses of the United States of America, they should kneel beginning after the singing or recitation of the Sanctus until after the Amen of the Eucharistic Prayer, except when prevented on occasion by reasons of health, lack of space, the large number of people present, or some other good reason. Those who do not kneel ought to make a profound bow when the priest genuflects after the consecration.

The faithful kneel after the Agnus Dei unless the diocesan Bishop determines otherwise. Among gestures included are also actions and processions: of the priest going with the deacon and ministers to the altar; of the deacon carrying the Evangeliary or Book of the Gospels to the ambo before the proclamation of the Gospel; of the faithful presenting the gifts and coming forward to receive Communion.

It is appropriate that actions and processions of this sort be carried out with decorum while the chants proper to them occur, in keeping with the norms prescribed for each. Silence Sacred silence also, as part of the celebration, is to be observed at the designated times. Thus within the Act of Penitence and again after the invitation to pray, all recollect themselves; but at the conclusion of a reading or the homily, all meditate briefly on what they have heard; then after Communion, they praise and pray to God in their hearts.

Even before the celebration itself, it is commendable that silence to be observed in the church, in the sacristy, in the vesting room, and in adjacent areas, so that all may dispose themselves to carry out the sacred action in a devout and fitting manner. The Introductory Rites The rites preceding the Liturgy of the Word, namely the Entrance, Greeting, Act of Penitence, Kyrie, Gloria, and collect, have the character of a beginning, introduction, and preparation.

In certain celebrations that are combined with Mass according to the norms of the liturgical books, the Introductory Rites are omitted or performed in a particular way.

The Entrance After the people have gathered, the Entrance chant begins as the priest enters with the deacon and ministers. The purpose of this chant is to open the celebration, foster the unity of those who have been gathered, introduce their thoughts to the mystery of the liturgical season or festivity, and accompany the procession of the priest and ministers.

The singing at this time is done either alternately by the choir and the people or in a similar way by the cantor and the people, or entirely by the people, or by the choir alone. In the dioceses of the United States of America there are four options for the Entrance Chant: 1 the antiphon from The Roman Missal or the Psalm from the Roman Gradual as set to music there or in another musical setting; 2 the seasonal antiphon and Psalm of the Simple Gradual; 3 a song from another collection of psalms and antiphons, approved by the Conference of Bishops or the diocesan Bishop, including psalms arranged in responsorial or metrical forms; 4 a suitable liturgical song similarly approved by the Conference of Bishops or the diocesan Bishop.

Greeting of the Altar and of the People Gathered Together When they reach the sanctuary, the priest, the deacon, and the ministers reverence the altar with a profound bow. As an expression of veneration, moreover, the priest and deacon then kiss the altar itself; as the occasion suggests, the priest also incenses the cross and the altar. When the Entrance chant is concluded, the priest stands at the chair and, together with the whole gathering, makes the Sign of the Cross.

Then he signifies the presence of the Lord to the community gathered there by means of the Greeting. After the greeting of the people, the priest, the deacon, or a lay minister may very briefly introduce the faithful to the Mass of the day. The Act of Penitence Then the priest invites those present to take part in the Act of Penitence, which, after a brief pause for silence, the entire community carries out through a formula of general confession.

On Sundays, especially in the Season of Easter, in place of the customary Act of Penitence, from time to time the blessing and sprinkling of water to recall Baptism may take place. After the Act of Penitence, the Kyrie is always begun, unless it has already been included as part of the Act of Penitence. Since it is a chant by which the faithful acclaim the Lord and implore his mercy, it is ordinarily done by all, that is, by the people and the choir or cantor having a part in it. As a rule, each acclamation is sung or said twice, though it may be repeated several times, by reason of the character of the various languages, as well as of the artistry of the music or of other circumstances.

When the Kyrie is sung as a part of the Act of Penitence, a trope may precede each acclamation. The Gloria The Gloria is a very ancient and venerable hymn in which the Church, gathered together in the Holy Spirit, glorifies and entreats God the Father and the Lamb. The text of this hymn may not be replaced by any other text. The Gloria is intoned by the priest or, if appropriate, by a cantor or by the choir; but it is sung either by everyone together, or by the people alternately with the choir, or by the choir alone.

If not sung, it is to be recited either by all together or by two parts of the congregation responding one to the other. It is sung or said on Sundays outside the Seasons of Advent and Lent, on solemnities and feasts, and at special celebrations of a more solemn character. The Collect Next the priest invites the people to pray. Then the priest says the prayer which is customarily known as the collect and through which the character of the celebration is expressed.

The people, uniting themselves to this entreaty, make the prayer their own with the acclamation, Amen. There is always only one collect used in a Mass. The Liturgy of the Word The main part of the Liturgy of the Word is made up of the readings from Sacred Scripture together with the chants occurring between them. The homily, Profession of Faith, and Prayer of the Faithful, however, develop and conclude this part of the Mass.

For in the readings, as explained by the homily, God speaks to his people, [58] opening up to them the mystery of redemption and salvation, and offering them spiritual nourishment; and Christ himself is present in the midst of the faithful through his word. Finally, having been nourished by it, they pour out their petitions in the Prayer of the Faithful for the needs of the entire Church and for the salvation of the whole world. The Liturgy of the Word is to be celebrated in such a way as to promote meditation, and so any sort of haste that hinders recollection must clearly be avoided.

During the Liturgy of the Word, it is also appropriate to include brief periods of silence, accommodated to the gathered assembly, in which, at the prompting of the Holy Spirit, the word of God may be grasped by the heart and a response through prayer may be prepared.

It may be appropriate to observe such periods of silence, for example, before the Liturgy of the Word itself begins, after the first and second reading, and lastly at the conclusion of the homily.

Moreover, it is unlawful to substitute other, non-biblical texts for the readings and responsorial Psalm, which contain the word of God. In the celebration of the Mass with a congregation, the readings are always proclaimed from the ambo. By tradition, the function of proclaiming the readings is ministerial, not presidential. The readings, therefore, should be proclaimed by a lector, and the Gospel by a deacon or, in his absence, a priest other than the celebrant.

If, however, a deacon or another priest is not present, the priest celebrant himself should read the Gospel. Further, if another suitable lector is also not present, then the priest celebrant should also proclaim the other readings. After each reading, whoever reads gives the acclamation, to which the gathered people reply, honoring the word of God that they have received in faith and with grateful hearts.

The reading of the Gospel is the high point of the Liturgy of the Word. The Liturgy itself teaches that great reverence is to be shown to it by setting it off from the other readings with special marks of honor: whether on the part of the minister appointed to proclaim it, who prepares himself by a blessing or prayer; or on the part of the faithful, who stand as they listen to it being read and through their acclamations acknowledge and confess Christ present and speaking to them; or by the very marks of reverence that are given to the Book of the Gospels.

The Responsorial Psalm After the first reading comes the responsorial Psalm, which is an integral part of the Liturgy of the Word and holds great liturgical and pastoral importance, because it fosters meditation on the word of God. The responsorial Psalm should correspond to each reading and should, as a rule, be taken from the Lectionary. Hence, the psalmist, or the cantor of the Psalm, sings the verses of the Psalm from the ambo or another suitable place. The entire congregation remains seated and listens but, as a rule, takes part by singing the response, except when the Psalm is sung straight through without a response.

In order, however, that the people may be able to sing the Psalm response more readily, texts of some responses and Psalms have been chosen for the various seasons of the year or for the various categories of Saints. These may be used in place of the text corresponding to the reading whenever the Psalm is sung. If the Psalm cannot be sung, then it should be recited in such a way that it is particularly suited to fostering meditation on the word of God. In the dioceses of the United States of America, the following may also be sung in place of the Psalm assigned in the Lectionary for Mass: either the proper or seasonal antiphon and Psalm from the Lectionary, as found either in the Roman Gradual or Simple Gradual or in another musical setting; or an antiphon and Psalm from another collection of the psalms and antiphons, including psalms arranged in metrical form, providing that they have been approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the diocesan Bishop.

ACKMAN P G PRESENTATION PDF

General Instruction of the Roman Missal

Gami Altare, in quo sacrificium crucis sub signis sacramentalibus praesens efficitur, est etiam mensa Domini, ad quam participandam in Missa populus Dei convocatur; atque centrum gratiarum actionis, quae per Eucharistiam perficitur. Ad suum munus recte implendum necesse est, ut psalmista et arte psallendi et facultate recte pronuntiandi et dicendi polleat. Fidelibus, qui forte sub specie tantum panis communicare volunt, sacra Communio hac forma praebeatur. RomanRite — Roman Missal guide Now the center and summit of the entire celebration begins: Quando diaconus Episcopo ministrat, librum ei defert osculandum vel ipse osculatur, secreto dicens: Candelabra autem et crux effigie Christi crucifixi ornata in processione ad introitum afferri possunt. In Missa tres genuflexiones fiunt a sacerdote celebrante, hoc est: If, however, the minister is a deacon, he performs his proper duties cf. Purificatione calicis expleta, oportet ut sacerdos aliquam pausam silentii servet; postea vero dicit orationem post Communionem. If, however, the Son is mentioned at the end of this prayer, the conclusion is, Qui vivit et regnat in saecula saeculorum Who lives and reigns forever and ever.

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GIRM 2002 PDF

Doujora Ornatus ecclesiae ad nobilem ipsius simplicitatem conferat, potius quam ad pompam. However, insofar as possible, he stands back slightly, behind the concelebrating priests standing around the principal celebrant. Deinde librum osculo veneratur, secreto dicens: Moved by the same desire and pastoral concern, the Vatican Council was able to give renewed consideration to what was established by Trent on Communion under both kinds. Doxologia finalis Precis eucharisticae solummodo a sacerdote celebrante principali una cum aliis concelebrantibus profertur, non autem a fidelibus.

DOCUJET 4016 PDF

Fenrishicage Potest etiam, ipse sacerdos vel alius minister, brevissimis verbis introducere fideles in Missam illius diei. In this case the principal celebrant receives Communion under both kinds in the usual way cf. When the prayer is concluded, the priest genuflects, takes the host consecrated in the same Mass, and, holding it slightly raised above the paten or above the chalice, while facing the people, says, Ecce Agnus Dei This is the Lamb of God. Curent sacri pastores fidelibus, qui ritum participant, vel ei intersunt, aptiore quo fieri potest modo doctrinam catholicam de forma sacrae Communionis in mentem revocare iuxta Concilium Tridentinum. Postea sacerdos ad sedem redire potest. Postea sacerdos invitat ad actum paenitentialem, qui, post brevem pausam silentii, a tota communitate formula confessionis generalis perficitur, et sacerdotis absolutione concluditur, quae tamen efficacia sacramenti paenitentiae caret.

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