BLACK ELK SPEAKS NEIHARDT PDF

Cite this Literature Note Book Summary Black Elk Speaks, a personal narrative, has the characteristics of several genres: autobiography, testimonial, tribal history, and elegy. As a tribal history, it records the transition of the Sioux nation from pre-reservation to reservation culture, including their participation in the Battle of Little Bighorn, the ghost dance, and the massacre at Wounded Knee. As an elegy, it mourns the passing of an age of innocence and freedom for the American Indian and his current cultural displacement. In these two pieces, Neihardt describes the circumstances of his conversation with Black Elk.

Author:Grot Shakarr
Country:Monaco
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Career
Published (Last):26 May 2008
Pages:19
PDF File Size:2.64 Mb
ePub File Size:11.51 Mb
ISBN:857-1-20751-986-3
Downloads:61236
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Kazralabar



Cite this Literature Note Book Summary Black Elk Speaks, a personal narrative, has the characteristics of several genres: autobiography, testimonial, tribal history, and elegy. As a tribal history, it records the transition of the Sioux nation from pre-reservation to reservation culture, including their participation in the Battle of Little Bighorn, the ghost dance, and the massacre at Wounded Knee. As an elegy, it mourns the passing of an age of innocence and freedom for the American Indian and his current cultural displacement.

In these two pieces, Neihardt describes the circumstances of his conversation with Black Elk. Chapter 3, the longest and most complicated chapter of the book, describes the vision that Black Elk was granted when he was nine years old. From this vision, Black Elk gains a sense of himself as different from others in his band in ways that are both privileged and unsettling. Chapters 4 through 9 chart increasing tension between the Sioux and white Americans, as settlement and commercial enterprise expand westward into Indian territory.

The dislocation and loss of culture that the Sioux suffered as a consequence of such events as the discovery of gold in Montana and the building of the Transcontinental Railroad erupts in the Battle of Little Bighorn, recorded in Chapter 9. Government annexed more and more Indian territory and established Indian agencies and reservations. In Chapter 11, U. In Chapter 12, Black Elk finds himself with a small group of his people in virtual exile in Canada, trying to avoid the inevitable reservation life.

These chapters also depict the performance of public rituals the horse dance and the heyoka ceremony that allow Black Elk to assume his role publicly. He has another vision, the dog vision, in Chapter 15, and in Chapter 17 performs his first cure.

He becomes close to a young woman in Paris and suddenly falls ill while visiting her. During his illness, he has another vision. In Chapter 21, Black Elk comes home to an almost totally displaced community, living on reservations, with the bison herd all but extinct.

Chapters 23 and 24 describe the death of Sitting Bull and the massacre at Wounded Knee.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY PROCESS AND PRACTICE BY DONALD F KURATKO PDF

Black Elk Speaks

When the two men met, Black Elk recognized that Neihardt was a sympathetic listener, someone interested in the spiritual world and in Indian history. He wanted to tell Neihardt his life story, especially the story of his vision, because he felt he would soon die. Black Elk, 68 years old at the time, would die in at the age of 87; Neihardt, 43, would live to be Black Elk had not told many people about this vision; as the story progresses, the reader learns that Black Elk has not told even his best friend, Standing Bear. Black Elk said to Neihardt, "What I know was given to me for men and it is true and it is beautiful. Soon I shall be under the grass and it will be lost.

EW 101 DAVID ADAMY PDF

Background[ edit ] In the summer of , as part of his research into the Native American perspective on the Ghost Dance movement, the poet and writer John G. Neihardt , already the Nebraska poet laureate, received the necessary permission from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to go to the Pine Ridge Reservation. Accompanied by his two daughters, he went to meet an Oglala holy man named Black Elk. His intention was to talk to someone who had participated in the Ghost Dance. For the most part, the reservations were not then open to visitors. Neihardt recounts that Black Elk invited him back for interviews. Flying Hawk served as their translator.

EJERCICIOS RESUELTOS DE ELECTROMETALURGIA PDF

.

Related Articles