ASAHI PENTAX MX MANUAL PDF

Horizontal position Hold the camera firmly with your left hand, and draw your arms close to your body Vertical position Hold your camera tightly to your forehead with your left hand, and draw your right arm close to your body. Vertical position Hold your camera tightly to your forehead with your left hand, raise your right arm and draw your left arm to your body. Lift up the rewind crank. Depress the film rewind button and turn the rewind crank as indicated to rewind the film into its cartridge.

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Horizontal position Hold the camera firmly with your left hand, and draw your arms close to your body Vertical position Hold your camera tightly to your forehead with your left hand, and draw your right arm close to your body. Vertical position Hold your camera tightly to your forehead with your left hand, raise your right arm and draw your left arm to your body. Lift up the rewind crank. Depress the film rewind button and turn the rewind crank as indicated to rewind the film into its cartridge.

Rewind until the tension on the crank lessens, indicating that the leader end of the film has been released from the take-up spool. Pull out the film rewind knob the back will open automatically , and remove the film cartridge. The table on the next page shows which flash contact, which shutter speed and which flash bulb may be combined for maximum lamp efficiency.

Unless these combinations are rigidly followed, there will be a failure in flash synchronization. Note the "X" setting is exactly at the 60 mark on the shutter speed dial. This indicates the highest shutter speed at which electronic flash units may be used. Use the hot shoe flash contact when using a shoe mount electronic flash like the Pentax Autostrob which has a flash contact on the shoe bracket.

When using the hot shoe, there is no need to plug the flash cord into the X terminal on the front of the body. The hot shoe flash contact turns to "hot" switched on only when you insert a shoe mount electronic flash. It remains "cold" disconnected even when using an electronic flash with its cord plugged into the X terminal on the body front. This eliminates the danger of electric shocks.

There are basically two types of flash bulb attachments on the market: clip-on types and bracket types. Either can be used with your camera. The clip-on types are attached to the hot shoe and the bracket types are attached via the tripod socket. The correct terminal and the correct shutter speed to use for each of these three types are outlined in the table below.

Before attaching the flash unit to the camera, you must remove the protective plug from the proper terminal. When not using the terminals, keep the plugs inserted. If you want to know how great the depth of field is at a certain aperture, focus on a subject and look through the viewfinder while moving the Self-timer lever toward the lens, and you will be able to preview the depth of field.

Or, after focusing, look at the depth-of-field scale on the lens. In the photograph below, the distance scale is set at 5 meters; that is, the lens is focused on a subject 5 meters away. The calibrations on each side of the distance index correspond to the diaphragm setting and indicate the range of in-focus distance for different lens apertures. You will note from the depth-of-field scale in the photograph that the range from approximately 4 to 7m is in focus.

Note that as the lens aperture changes, the effective depth of field also changes. For the depths of field at different apertures and distances, refer to the next page.

Therefore, the proper LED exposure read-out should be obtained after you have focused your subject on the ground glass. As you will note from the table below, with ASA film, you may use any shutter speed from 1 sec. The total range of the aperture settings is, of course, determined by the minimum and maximum apertures of the lens being used. Sometimes, however, there is a great difference between the light reflected from the background and the light reflected from the subject.

In such a case, to achieve a really good photo, you must compensate for the difference by opening or closing down the aperture 1 or 2 stops. As a general rule, when the subject is darker than the background, you compensate by opening your aperture 1 or 2 stops more. For example: on a bright day, when your subject has his back to the sun and you are shooting directly toward the sun When your subject is brighter than the background - if he is standing in a spotlight, for example - you make the aperture 1 or 2 stops smaller to compensate.

When the aperture size is the most important factor, set the aperture desired by turning the aperture ring. Then adjust the shutter speed dial until the green LED illuminates.

When shutter speed is the more important factor, turn the dial to the speed you desire. Then adjust the aperture ring until the green LED illuminates. After depressing the shutter button, turn the lock lever which is on the collar at the base of the shutter button so that the letter "L" is visible. When the exposure time is up, move the lock lever back to its original position.

This automatically releases the shutter button. In addition to making "Time" exposure, the lock lever is also used to turn off the meter circuit and simultaneously prevent accidental release of the shutter.

Therefore, your camera can still be operated even if the batteries have worn out. If the batteries have worn out and the exposure meter is no longer functioning, you must determine the correct combination of shutter speed and aperture size yourself, from your own experience.

Also, packed in with most types of 35mm film is a data sheet with suggestions for determining the correct exposure in a variety of situations. When using the Self-timer, do not depress the shutter button Then, push the start button, and the Self-timer will commence.

First, bring your subject into sharp focus. Then determine the subject-to-camera distance from the distance scale on the lens. Then match your subject-to-camera distance to the infra-red mark by turning the focusing ring accordingly. For instance, if your subject is in focus at infinity, turn the focusing ring and move the infinity 00 mark to the infra-red mark.

NOTE: An infra-red focusing adjustment is not required when working with infra-red color film. Webmaster: If you are interested in IR film, go digital. Then tighten the film by turning the rewind knob , and keep hold of the rewind knob. Depress the film rewind release button and advance the rapid-wind lever.

This winds the shutter without advancing the film. Finally release the shutter to make the second exposure. Then make one blank exposure, before taking the next picture, to avoid overlapping.

As the exposure counter continues to function each time the shutter is wound, a double exposure will be counted as two frames. Webmaster: You also have to compensate for the additional light hitting the film on multiple exposures on the same frame. To remove the standard focusing screen, pull the screen retainer pin toward you with the pincette supplied with the interchangeable focusing screen.

The focusing screen will then flip down. Remove the screen from the frame by grasping the protruding portion of the screen with the pincette. To install the screen of your choice, place it on the screen frame, pushing it back to the original position until it locks with a click. To remove dust particles from the screen, never wipe it with a cloth, or the like, but just use a blower. However, when Adaptor K is used, the following is true: 1. Due to the difference in coupling systems, the automatic diaphragm will not function.

Full-aperture metering lenses will function as stop-down metering lenses. How to Use Mount Adaptor K 1. Screw the conventional Takumar lens into the Mount Adaptor K. This takes slightly less than a quarter of a revolution. To remove the lens, leaving the Mount Adaptor K attached to the camera body, simply unscrew the lens counterclockwise.

Other screw-mount Takumar lenses can then be attached in the normal way. To remove the Mount Adaptor K from the camera body, first remove the screw-mount lens. Then press, with your thumbnail or a pointed object such as a ballpoint pen, against the spring pin Turn the Mount Adaptor K counterclockwise until you feel it release, and take it out.

Since the mechanism for locking in the Mount Adaptor K is totally different from that which locks in an SMC Pentax bayonet-mount lens, the lens release lever on the camera body plays no part at all.

Webmaster: Only purchase an original Pentax adapter. I have heard of stores of the adapter getting stuck on the body or lenses getting stuck on the body by cheap copies. The ultra telephotos do not have a diaphragm coupler, so they must be used with the stop-down metering system. Whenever any one of these is used between the camera body and an SMC Pentax lens, the stop down metering system must be used. However, resistance to cold could be hampered by oil which has become dirty.

Therefore, if the camera is to operate at full efficiency in very cold conditions, it must be overhauled and all oil must be replaced. Sudden changes in temperature will often cause moisture to condense inside or outside your camera.

This is a possible source of rust, which may be extremely damaging to the mechanism. Furthermore, if the camera goes from a warm temperature to a sub-freezing one, and if tiny drops of moisture freeze, further damage may be done by their expansion. Thus, sudden temperature changes should be avoided as much as possible. If this is not possible, keeping the camera in its case or bag will help somewhat in minimizing the effects of a rapid temperature change.

Extremely low temperature reduces the efficiency of the battery. Therefore, the camera should be protected against low temperature. Put the batteries into the camera right before shooting. For extremely low temperature, use new batteries. Always keep the viewfinder eyepiece, lens and filters as clean as possible. To remove loose dust and dirt, first use the blower and then the brush of a lens brush.

Smudges, such as fingerprints, should be carefully wiped away with either lens tissue or a clean, soft cloth. Clean, plain cotton handkerchiefs that have already been washed a few times are particularly good for this. Breathing on the lens before wiping is effective; but be sure to wipe away all moisture completely. Commercial lens cleaners are also effective.

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Pentax MX Manual

Turn the aperture ring to get a proper LED exposure read-out in the viewfinder. On the right-hand side of the viewfinder, appear the preselected shutter speed plus two adjacent speeds e. Lift up the rewind crank. Depress the film rewind button and turn the rewind crank as indicated to rewind the film into its cartridge. The table on the next page shows which flash contact, which shutter speed and which flash bulb may be combined for maximum lamp efficiency. If you want to know how great the depth of field is at a certain aperture, focus on a subject and look through the viewfinder while moving the Self-timer lever toward the lens, and you will be able to preview the depth of

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Pentax MX Service Manual

Internally, the MX is essentially a smaller, lighter version of the Pentax KX , and otherwise has little in common with the rest of the Pentax M-series. However, the MX was designed as the mechanical twin sister of the remarkably successful entry-level Pentax ME. The MX was solidly built, and featured a fully mechanical construction, including a mechanical shutter of the horizontal cloth type. Only the light metering system was dependent on batteries.

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It is incredibly well built. The battery is unneeded except for in-camera metering. The meter is very accurate. Initially the LED type metering display was a bit annoying but I quickly grew to like it very much simply because I can see it in the dimmest of scenes which is just not true of nearly every other needle type viewfinder display of the era. Certainly the LEDs may be prone to failure eventually but none of my copies have ever had a problem nor shown any signs of one.

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