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Add to registry About This Item We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer Traces the changing nature of Baroque representation across European and Latin American cultures, from an imperial aesthetic encoding Catholic ideologies, into a means of resistance to colonialism, into a mode of postcolonial self-definition. Baroque New Worlds traces the changing nature of Baroque representation in Europe and the Americas across four centuries, from its seventeenth-century origins as a Catholic and monarchical aesthetic and ideology to its contemporary function as a postcolonial ideology aimed at disrupting entrenched power structures and perceptual categories. Baroque forms are exuberant, ample, dynamic, and porous, and in the regions colonized by Catholic Europe, the Baroque was itself eventually colonized. Today, under the rubric of the Neobaroque, this transculturated Baroque continues to impel artistic expression in literature, the visual arts, architecture, and popular entertainment worldwide.

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What possibilities in baroque are open now in relation to present dilemmas in art history and world events? It permits a liberation from periodization and linear time, as well as from historicism. While the scholars below acknowledge that baroque is often equated with style or historical period, it is most productively thought beyond them. In its materiality and bodiliness, baroque undermines resolution, gropes towards fragmentation, overgrows, and exceeds.

Baroque architecture may be seen as overflowing, an excess of ornamental exteriority and evasive proliferation. This brings to the fore the question of surface. Baroque time and form impinge on each other — that is, not simply the time that it takes to process point of view into form, but of form into point of view. The question of materiality not mere matter, materials, or technique must also come into play. The Baroque, crossroads of signs and temporalities, aesthetic logic of mourning and melancholy, luxuriousnesss and pleasure, erotic convulsion and allegorical pathos, reappears to bear witness to the crisis or end of modernity and to the very condition of a continent that could not be assimilated by the project of the Enlightenment.

Certainly, this has been the dominant model within European scholarship on European baroque. In the great churches of Pallavicino in Bologna the cry of the Counter-Reformation resounds. But this is far from the situation in Naples or Sicily where the greatest adventures of the baroque take place figs.

Baroque is far more than a first response to the spiritual crisis of the Reformation. Hostilities to Muslims, Moriscos and Jews arguably have as much purchase as anti-Protestantism. Far from it. It is vital to recall that the Spanish monarchy took advantage of baroque for its imperializing projects within Europe, as well as beyond it. Indeed, arguably, it is precisely here that new paradigms are most urgently needed.

Does baroque exhalt in the ineradicable character of antagonism? History is too readily mobilized for political ends. Resisting periodization assists in thwarting simple historicism. Baroque as a non-objectivist mode might explore slippages between appearance and truth, deception and insight. On the other hand, it might reiterate these tropes precisely as a means to halt a rethinking of history and thus also of an opening of a different future.

One needs only to consider the usefulness of baroque to the absolutists. It is, rather, the untapped possibilities within baroque that can now be engaged.

Baroque brings discrepancy and rupture, not simply harmony: the shattering of what was taken for granted. This is not a question of linear time: baroque is always already contemporary. Fold and scale are already at play and one is enfolded in what one studies: point of view involves self-reflection, a self-awareness and self-consciousness.

A serious engagement with history as a problem should prevent this from being a simply narcissistic matter. The fold involves the subject within materialist experience, but the matter or materiality extends beyond the subject. Do you use it? What do you see as its principal opportunities and traps? Monika Kaup. As I argued there, after four centuries of nonlinear development across multiple boundaries among nations, ethnic groups, historical periods, and disciplines, we have to dispense with the notion of one single baroque, the property of segregated social groups and disciplines.

In short, the transhistorical and transcultural continuities of the baroque and neobaroque pose the problem of theorizing emergence and the phenomenon of re-origination. Dynamic systems are those operating far from equilibrium, which have self-regulating mechanisms, multiple causality, and interactive feedback loops that allow the system to maintain itself in a dynamic state of balance. Complexity or self-organization theory was first elaborated by chemist Ilya Prigogine and further developed by biologists Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela, and Stuart Kauffman as well as sociologists such as Niklas Luhmann.

Claire Farago. For the past year I have been working on a research topic centered on early seventeenth-century Rome that bears directly on the construction of chronological turning points, specifically on the locus classicus for the transition from the Late Renaissance to the baroque in painting. Soon, however, he directed his patronage to the new modern style exemplified in the work of Pietro da Cortona, whose bravura brushwork and dynamic compositions consisting of voluminous, dramatically foreshortened allegorical personifications and historical figures praising the Barberini family soon decorated the ceiling of the family palace.

Stefano Jacoviello. This shift has been relevant not only for the history of the arts and aesthetics but for studies on culture in general. Reasoning through anachronisms, and pointing out common forms and devices in objects pertaining to diverse periods and fields of knowledge, helps to intimately understand Seicento works while at the same time showing how and why they concern us. That is the path I usually try take in my research about music, between semiotics and theory of arts.

Coping with the impossible congruence of authors like Gesualdo, Monteverdi, Frescobaldi, Vivaldi, Bach and Leo without relying upon mere chronological labels late, early, full… does not seem so intriguing to the majority of scholars.

Jens Baumgarten and Gabriela Siracusano. It can be seen from either a historiographical or a theoretical or conceptual perspective. This includes a distinct meaning of the term itself and its cultural implications and categories. The label is also important because it is, in our opinion, one of the founding terms of art history as a discipline.

When teaching we characterize the baroque as a dazzling notion that everyone seems to agree upon spontaneously but one which, when one is asked to define it, leads to rich discussions and debates.

Jens Baumgarten. One of my research fields is to analyze the different traditions of the baroque in Europe and Latin America — its differentiations and contradictions. Gabriela Siracusano. As for studies regarding the material dimension of Spanish American artistic production, it is worth saying that, although the art of Spanish, native, mestizo and creole artists may have displayed materials and techniques similar to those used on the Old Continent, they applied diverse and original strategies to create images seemingly quite different from those that, over time, came to be understood as baroque in the historiography.

While focusing on Brazil, whose modern cultural identity is founded on the idea of the baroque, the cultural context of the baroque discourse will be extended to the spheres of influence of the early modern Portuguese and Spanish empires. The exploration of local adaptations of architectural style and national myths of modernity, for example, can also be helpful. The transcultural approach to the baroque covers the cross-cultural impact of its style, the intercultural and local differentiation of its forms and meanings, its function as a means of cultural hybridization and amalgamation, and its uses as a means of national identity building.

The transhistorical approach points to the alleged historical transcendence and universality of the baroque style, as established by late nineteenth century art history, and aims at analyzing the ensuing ideological and aesthetic constructions of history in Latin America.

The global baroque calls for an interdisciplinary method, including different fields of the humanities and social sciences such as economics and anthropology. This approach can facilitate the reevaluation not only of the relations between Christian colonizers and the indigenous communities, but also between the contemporary scholar and her objects of research, and offers alternative concepts to the dichotomy of center and periphery.

In order to deal with the complexity of a global baroque and avoid the perpetuation of national art-historical traditions and mythologies, it is necessary to compare Latin American baroque, for example, to Asian contexts, and to address the appropriation of the baroque in twentieth- and twenty-first-century art-historical and political discourses.

The formation of an artistic system in the Americas and Asia, ensuing from dialogues and clashes between European models and local prescriptions, will be a major point of discussion. The circulation of art objects, not only between European nations and their colonies, but also among the different colonial settings and between European countries themselves, will be taken into account. Helen Hills. In recent years, a wide range of scholarship has re-engaged with the question of baroque and its histories, especially through the work of Walter Benjamin and Gilles Deleuze.

How useful is this approach? What are its premises, its promises, and its strengths? What are its weaknesses and its limits? I read Klein alongside scholars from other disciplines such as Rolena Adorno, Inga Clendinnen, John Elliott, James Lockhart, Sabine MacCormack, Anthony Pagden, Eric Wolfe, and the French anthropologist Serge Gruzinski, another important writer for me because his work dealt with partial recovery of the culturally dispossessed at a time when the very different interpretative standards of George Kubler still dominated the art-historical discourse.

Benjamin helped me give voice to what is urgently at stake in the re-writing of art history. To be honest I am not yet familiar with studies in my research field that refer to Benjamin in this sense.

Otherwise, if we understand the baroque as an epistemic structure, or a stylistic configuration crossing periods and forms of culture, there are many concepts propounded by Deleuze not only in his book on Leibniz that show an obvious efficacy if projected from the past time when they were created onto the contemporary, the scene of their applicability. Benjamin views baroque allegory as a critical, de-mystifying mode of insight that shatters the false harmonies of the dominant modern ideology of progress.

Gabriela Siracusano and Jens Baumgarten. How does one write visually about the Brazilian baroque and the translational processes of theoretical concepts and therefore, implicitly, about the relations to the neobaroque?

And how does one create a baroque canon? In her works on the neobaroque, Ndalianis, a film, art, and cultural historian, compares the media and entertainment culture, especially since the s, with the so-called historical baroque of the seventeenth century.

Paraphrasing Henri Focillon, she defines a trans-historical and -cultural baroque, namely a form that has dynamically and constantly shown its presence across the centuries, with varying degrees of intensity.

The moments of greatest intensity are those that interest her most. In her research she works predominantly with two concepts that are related to the trans-cultural concept of the neobaroque: the teatrum mundi and the Wunderkammer. This baroque created a fascination Faszinosum on the level of the cultural discourse as well that of cultural practice. Moser, in his cultural theoretic studies about the neobaroque, advances the hypothesis that the baroque was conceptualized as a rhetorical and aesthetic device puissance that was wielded differently in different media, as well as in distinct technical, political, and socio-economic contexts.

These approaches serve to analyze the potential of modern and contemporary entertainment culture to fully realize the baroque aesthetic of efficacy. Thus the neobaroque, through trans-medialization, recycles the baroque, its efficacy, and its historical topoi for contemporary mass culture. Teatrum mundi and Wunderkammer were always related to, and therefore contribute to, a theoretical debate on reality, virtuality, simulacrum, and spectacle. In her analysis of entertainment culture, including the decoration of casinos in Las Vegas, with their architecture of effects, Ndalianis shows their parallels to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century cabinets of curiosity.

The interior spaces in particular evoke and join different fragments from the whole world, thus creating an impression of sensorial immersion. Like in the early modern Wunderkammer, where the macrocosm is represented in the microcosm, the complete entertainment world is presented and represented in the microcosm of the Las Vegas casino. The spectator shifts to an intellectual register when he evaluates his miraculous, almost mystical experience. The church combines different elements that reflect a political, religious and aesthetic project of Brazilian culture and history.

It also shows the configurations of the discourse about an historical baroque and a transcultural and -historical neo-baroque. The architecture and decoration clearly reflect the idea of the relationship between Brazilian and European art history within a concept of one common baroque.

Additionally, I discuss the historiography on the historical baroque as a starting point to analyze specific notions of neo-baroque discourse in the Brazilian visual arts. This second topic seeks, through a case study of the art historian Hanna Levy, to demonstrate the importance of developing a transcultural neo-baroque. My intention is to focus on the ways in which baroque art is discussed in Brazil and the place that it occupies at the crossroads between Brazilian and European art historiography.

In music the term neobaroque usually recalls the present revival of stylistic elements of the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century discourse on music, and most notably the position of the virtuoso, including recuperation of some clothing accessories hats, frills….

It also can refer to a way of executing eighteenth-century compositions, highlighting connections with present modes of producing, experiencing, and consuming music, with an eye on the market. This comparative investigation, arced backwards from the present to the past, aims to identify the theoretical similarities as well as the practical differences that depend on the specific habits in consuming cultural objects present in diverse communities and periods.

Current morphological trends in art production toward restraint or excess, fragmentation, and instability find an echo in the scientific approach, which is tending toward complexity, dispersion, indetermination, and approximation. Thus we discover a direct nexus between these formal categories and their expression in social practices.

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Baroque forms are exuberant, ample, dynamic, and porous, and in the regions colonized by Catholic Europe, the Baroque was itself eventually colonized. Today, under the rubric of the Neobaroque, this transculturated Baroque continues to impel artistic expression in literature, the visual arts, architecture, and popular entertainment worldwide. Since Neobaroque reconstitutions necessarily reference the European Baroque, this volume begins with the reevaluation of the Baroque that evolved in Europe during the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth. Their essays lay the groundwork for the revisionist Latin American essays, many of which have not been translated into English until now. This collection moves between art history and literary criticism to provide a rich interdisciplinary discussion of the transcultural forms and functions of the Baroque. Dorothy Z.

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What possibilities in baroque are open now in relation to present dilemmas in art history and world events? It permits a liberation from periodization and linear time, as well as from historicism. While the scholars below acknowledge that baroque is often equated with style or historical period, it is most productively thought beyond them. In its materiality and bodiliness, baroque undermines resolution, gropes towards fragmentation, overgrows, and exceeds. Baroque architecture may be seen as overflowing, an excess of ornamental exteriority and evasive proliferation. This brings to the fore the question of surface.

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